Radio’s Move to Mobile

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I’ve said it repeatedly since the debut of this blog: the mobile market is one of the radio industry’s most important areas to focus on.  In the two-and-a-half years since I’ve been writing for Radio2020, I’ve repeatedly returned to the topic. The meteoric rise in both capabilities and adoption of the Droid, Blackberry and iPhone alone  prove my point; just look at the plethora of  radio apps for them.

The debut of the iPad and its competitors adds a new dimension to this evolution. While new to the market, it expands the range of  what is considered “mobile,” while attempting to create a new niche in the existing array of available products. If sales are any indication, they seem to be doing a good job of it. It’s just the latest step away from the traditional computer.

Jeanette Borzo of The Wall Street Journal wrote a terrific column on the subject from which I’d like to share a few key points:

Earlier this year, Cisco Systems Inc. (CSCO) Chief Technology Officer Padmasree Warrior said she expects 1 trillion mobile devices to be connected to the Internet by 2013, compared with just 500 million in 2007.

On Wednesday morning, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc.’s (DWA) Jeffrey Katzenberg said he believes Apple’s iPad and other upcoming tablet devices represent the future of computers and media consumption, especially among younger people. Katzenberg himself said he no longer uses a laptop, relying instead on an iPad and a BlackBerry cellphone. “The laptop is yesterday’s news,” he said.

For some, moving beyond the PC era–which many say started when Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) went public in 1985–means a rejuvenation of business.

“Mobile is the second coming of radio,” said Vivian Schiller, president and chief executive at National Public radio, adding that Internet-based radio gives listeners more choices. “All the devices are so easy to take with you, and you can listen to any stream you want. When I’m in my car, I no longer have to be restricted to my local radio station.”

Another aspect that I find fascinating is that  due to the nature of these devices, there is a native prejudice in favor of audio content — things you can be entertained by while driving or walking. As the level of ubiquity increases for mobile devices, Ms. Schiller’s “second coming of radio” comment above becomes more and more valid.

The two things that are most important to look at are the decoupling of the Internet from the computer, and radio’s embrace and leveraging of that same Internet. Is your radio station ready?

Image: William Hook / CC 2.0

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